Hello! My name is Karin and I’m a sugar addict.

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For a long time I wanted to write about my struggle with sugar, but I had to research the subject properly and collect as much information as possible. Now, I feel that I can share what I learned in the process, all of the information was collected by me and it is my personal opinion.

I used to eat in ways that weren’t healthy, it was mainly by the form of Nutella and chocolate bars, and it became an addiction: Nutella on toast, Nutella in a pitta, biscuits covered in Nutella and Nutella with a spoon!!

I couldn’t go to sleep without my fix of chocolate or wake up in the morning to face the world without a Nutella stuffed pita… and in between had lots of cravings and an endless need for the good old Nutella.  I never felt full or satisfied after whatever size meal I had without devouring, you guessed another spoonful of Nutella (or the jar!). Eventually I realised how bad my addiction was when I left everything one night at 11 pm to drive to the supermarket as the jar was empty.

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So I decided to put an end to that behaviour of mine and take back the control of the sugar over my life. I start learning about the subject, sticking my nose in every book on the subject (another addiction of mine…), and read any article on the Internet. I discussed with my GP (that found that my insulin level was very high and I’m nearly developing diabetes) and spoke to a nutritionist and dietician to make sure I was doing the right thing.

In that process, I learnt that we all weigh 11 kilos more today than 25 years ago! We are eating on average 375 calories more per day and that’s all after we reduced our total fat consumption as for years we have been told that fat is the enemy and need to consume a low fat diet.

SO where are all these extra calories coming from if it’s not from the fat? Why is obesity a major epidemic today? And type 2 diabetics is rising dramatically? It is not the fat! It’s from the excessive amount of carbohydrates in our diet.

Sugar dominates our diet and you can find it in nearly every food and drink: bread, coke, juices, ketchup, salad dressing, tins of tomatoes, baked beans, crisps, dried fruits, etc.

In the past we used to consume our sugars naturally from fruits and vegetables, then it started to increase. In the UK, we consume over 500gr of sugar a day, and that creates a major health problem. Not only does sugar consumption cause the obvious problems like tooth decay, but sugar is also linked to cancer, heart disease, impaired brain function, depression and anxiety.

The bottom line is that sugar is not our friend! And we have to eliminate it from our diet as much as possible. This is not easy, but making sure we eat the right food, reading the labels and preparing ahead of time will make it easier.

A couple of years ago I followed a very strict sugar detox and I must say it was one of the hardest things I have ever done. I went cold turkey and cut out all sugars from my diet which included fruits. After three days I started adding the good sugars back one at a time. The first week or so I had serious withdrawal symptoms that included: headaches, dizziness until I was nearly sick, my mood dipped, I had anger bursts, I had cravings that were so difficult to overcome. I was irritable and extremely tired. But eventually I got over the hump and I remember one day, having my afternoon snack of humus and red pepper sticks and I got caught in such a surprise when the pepper was sooo sweet, I realised that real food has so much more flavour when you eat sugar free.

During this time I had to keep reminding myself why I was doing it. First I was watching my kilograms melt away, especially around my middle area and the love handles. My sugar cravings stopped and my mood was over the moon, my high energy levels were back and my skin couldn’t look better!

I also start looking into healthier sugar alternatives and how to use them. There are lots of alternatives, some have more calories than the other, some have after-taste but zero calories and some are just full of fructose which is what we are trying to eliminate. They also have to have some kind of nutritional or health benefits and not just empty calories.

Stevia:

A herb native to central and South America and it is about 30 times sweeter than sugar but has NO calories and almost no glycaemic index which is making it suitable for diabetics as well as for weight loss.

It has got a bitter after-taste that last for quite a long time, but apparently you can find some blends today that have a better taste (I’ll let you know the make as soon as I find one). I tried Truvia for baking and  it had an after-taste.

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Xylitol:

Is a naturally occurring sugar from the Birch tree and also found in fibrous fruits and vegetables like beets, berries and corn.

It helps prevent bacteria from causing plaque to stick to our teeth and can help prevent tooth decay. It costs much more then sugar but it is much healthier alternative and has 9 calories per teaspoon, 40% less then sugar. It also had a low glycaemic index but as sweet as sugar.

You can substitute it in your recipes for half the amount of the sugar called for in the recipe.

 

Coconut Sugar:

Coconut sugar is nutritious and has a low glycaemic index, it tastes like brown sugar but a bit richer.

 

Raw Honey and Maple Syrup:

It is unrefined and unprocessed. It has many vitamins and minerals and helps with sore throats and cough.

Honey has more calories than sugar but sweeter so you can use less. When substituting honey for sugar use ½ cup honey per cup of sugar and reduce the amount of liquid by about ¼ cup for every cup of sugar.

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So today in preparation for next week RESET plan I made healthy sweet muffins to keep in the freezer and have as breakfast and they are really scrumptious.

Breakfast healthy muffins

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makes 18

ingredients:

3 eggs

1/2 cup Xylitol or truvia /1/4 cup Stevia (if you don’t mind the after taste)

1/4 cup tahini

11/2 cups Almond milk

1 tsp apple cider vinager                                          DSC_1906 (2)

2 tsp vanilla extract

2 tsp ground cinnamon

2 1/2 cups rolled oats

1/2 cup fine oats bran

1 grated apple

2 tsp baking powder

1 tsp bicarbonate soda

Topping: blueberries, pecan nuts, coconut flakes, walnuts, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, flaxseed, chia seeds etc.

Method:                                                               DSC_1904 (2)

  1. whisk the eggs with the xylitol.
  2. add all the other ingredients and mix just to blend, rest for 30 minutes.
  3. preheat oven to 160C.
  4. place muffins cups in a muffin tray and fill with 1/4 cup of the mixture
  5. top with you favorite topping or leave without the topping.
  6. bake for 20-25 minutes.
  7. enjoy 2 as your breakfast

 

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Also as it Tu Bishvat tomorrow, the Jewish festival for celebrating the birthday of the trees, I made with my kids out own home made dried fruits, traditionally eaten on that festival. We used lots of different fruits and the results are overwhelmingly good and soooo easy! That goes on my yogurt for breakfast tomorrow.

How to dry your own fruits in your oven

  1. Use any fruit you fancy: apples, plums, apricots, mango, banana, figs,strawberries, cranberries etc.
  2. Slice the fruit and prepare them

 

3. Soak the fruits in lemon / lime juice and water for 10 minutes or more, that will keep fruit looking pretty and minimize discoloration.  DSC_1985 (2)

4. Place directly on the oven net or on a tray with a baking paper.

5. Bake on 70C, for 4-6 hours.

 

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Please let me know your personal experience with reducing sugar in your diet and if you would like to know some more about the subject.

Have a fabulous sugar free week and I hope I didn’t bore you to sleep.

Lots of love

Karin

Two Healthy Cookies

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Quinçoise and Elana’s Fish with Capers

The last couple of days were so cold here in London, all white and frosty but the sky was blue and the sun was shining for me. I sat in my kitchen (with the heating on, of course), behind the glass doors enjoying the view of my garden , feeling the sun on my skin, dreaming of summer….

I had Salad Niçoise for lunch for the last two days, which paired perfectly with my day dreaming and sun bathing…

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I had it once with tuna and boiled eggs, no potatoes! I add quinoa to the salad on the second day to make it into a Quincoise …. Love that name.

Here is the recipe and some pictures I took.   DSC_1806 (2)

Quinçoise Salad or just Niçoise

 

Ingredients

Makes 2 big salads

  • 100gr Salad leaves
  • 150gr Green beans, steamed or boiled for 4 minutes
  • 1 Roasted Courgettes, chopped (or even fresh courgettes spiralized)
  • 4 hard-boiled Eggs
  • 1 tin tuna
  • 4-5 Kalamata olives
  • 1 cup Quinoa, cooked

For the salad dressing:

  • 1 small shallot, chopped
  • 2-3 large cloves garlic, chopped
    4 anchovy fillets
  • 1 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 lemon juice
    1/3 cup olive oil
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ¼ teaspoon pepper

Method

  1. Place all the salad ingredients in a serving bowl.
  2. Prepare the dressing by placing all the ingredients in a food processor and blend until smooth. The dressing will keep in the fridge up to 4 days and can be used on any other salad or vegetables.

 

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For dinner Elana cooked for her family and guests, fish with capers wrapped in baking paper, she served it with the Thai inspired Kale salad from day 1. That dinner is carb free and delicious.

Fish with capers, rosemary and olives      

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serves 4

Ingredients

  • 4 large (or 8 smaller) pieces of any white non-fatty fish fillets or loins eg:cod
  • 4 tbsp capers in brine
  • 12 olives in brine (pimento stuffed are nice)
  • 4 sprigs rosemary
  • 4 tbsp lemon juice
  • 4 anchovies fillets
  • 2 cloves garlic (2 frozen cubes)
  • 1-2 tsp fresh or dried dill

Method

  1. Line an ovenproof dish with foil, then line that with baking parchment*.
  2. Place fish in baking parchment.
  3. Add 4 tbsp lemon juice.
  4. Throw over capers and brine.
  5. Throw over olives and brine.
  6. Season well with rosemary, garlic and dill.
  7. Place one anchovy on each piece of fish.
  8. Cover with baking parchment so that fish is not dried out.
  9. Bake in oven for 30 mins at 180C.

 

 

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Elana would also like to talk about cooking with aluminium and foil, please find her warning and explanation here:

*Cooking with Aluminium – Warning

Foil or aluminium is now known to be toxic, and chronic exposure through cooking may be a causative factor in osteoporosis and possibly neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s. Excess aluminium in the body also impedes the deposition of calcium in the bones preventing bone mineralisation. While studies are less adamant about the link between aluminium and Alzheimer’s than about the osteoporosis connection, it does point to evidence that aluminium is deposited in brain tissue. Studies have found aluminium build-up in autopsies performed on Alzheimer’s sufferers.

 

Contamination with aluminium occurs when food comes into contact with heated aluminium equipment or foil since heat causes aluminium from foil to leach out into foods in significantly harmful amounts. Researchers found dangerously high levels of aluminium in foods after being cooked, reheated and even cooled on aluminium foil. The higher the temperature the higher the leaching.  Foil is not suitable for cooking and is not suitable for using with vegetables like tomatoes or citrus juice as foil and aluminium are unstable in the presence of acids (even when used for cold storage)

So here are a few simple steps you can use right away:

* Never cook, heat up, or place hot food on aluminium foil. Foil can be used to store  only cold foods in the refrigerator.

* However avoid storing tomatoes, citrus fruit or spices in foil even if cold.

*Replace foil with baking paper for cooking and storing food while still hot or use glass storage containers.

* Never use aluminium pots or cooking utensils, instead use stainless steel pots and pans.

Elana & Karin

Two Healthy Cookies

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Weight Loss Vs Fat Loss

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Salad Niçoise – Tomorrow’s recipe

 

It has been a fantastic official first week on our RESET plan. Not just that I lost some weight this week (over 1 kg) I also lost 2% of body fat that according to Elana Hirschowitz, the other healthy cookie: that is the most important thing, it’s the body fat (or mass-fat) that influences our body shape and our body composition, and that’s the real loss – so I’m delighted!

Now let me explain, when you talk about dieting, it’s safe to say that the majority of information out there focuses on weight loss. We all want to see the scale drop, the faster the better. For many of us, getting on the scale is difficult. But if you focus on body composition, the struggle can be a little bit more satisfactory.

Let’s say you step on the scale after dieting for a week and, hooray, the number has gone down by a kilo or more.

Here’s my question to you: What did you lose? Was it just water? Was it body fat? Was it muscle? Did you just have a rather large stool that morning and that’s why you weigh less? Can we rely on weight loss only? When all it can tell you is whether or not your weight has gone down or up and that can fluctuate from day to day (that’s the reason why we are not getting on the scale every day!).

RESET is aimed at improving body composition (e.g. more muscle with less fat) – A loss of 5% body fat to 10% body fat will show a real change in our body and health.

In order to achieve that, there are few rules we need to follow but today I will concentrate on one rule that I learnt and tried to master this week and it is that reducing the amount of carbohydrates in my diet is one of the best ways to lose weight that will lead to reduce my appetite and cause weight loss, without the need for calorie counting.

Studies also show that low-carb diets are particularly effective at reducing your belly fat, which is the most dangerous fat of all and highly associated with many diseases.

Therefore, we are allowing for a bit of carb but only 1 portion of low-GI carb per meal, one carb at a time and I should try and keep the carbs for breakfast and afternoon snack, keeping both lunch and dinner carb free.

However, one of the great benefits of low-carb diets is that they’re ridiculously simple. With the RESET plan we don’t count calories or track points, we teach you how to eat properly: when, what and how much.

The general rule is to just eat some protein, healthy fats and veggies at every meal. Throw in some nuts, seeds and dairy products for good measure, but don’t overdo the nuts as they contain lots of calories.

We also have two plates’ models:

  1. ¾ plate veg and ¼ protein – have more of that plate as often as you can
  2. ½ salad / veg, ¼ carb, ¼ protein

Example for a portion of low-GI carb to go on your ¼ of plate is: 75 gr sweet potatoes or 1/3 cup basmati rice. This plan restricts your intake of carbohydrates like sugars and starches (breads, pasta, etc.) and replaces them with protein and healthy fat.

It doesn’t get much simpler then that!

 

Carbs you can eat:

  • Plenty of vegetables.
  • 1-2 pieces of fruit per day.
  • 1 portion (a handful / 75gr) of starchy carbohydrates like Vivaldi potatoes, sweet potatoes and healthier grains like rice and oats.

 

Weight loss will slow down after the first week, but this time the fat will be coming from your fat stores.

 

My carb free dinner today was a delicious roasted chicken shawarma with green salad.

 

Shawarma style chicken  

INGREDIENTS

For the marinade:

  • lemon, zest and juice
  • 1/3cup olive oil
  • 6cloves garlic, peeled, smashed and minced              DSC_1816 (2)
  • 2teaspoons ground cumin
  • 2teaspoons sweet paprika
  • ½teaspoon turmeric
  • ½ tsp garlic powder
  • ½ tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp allspice
  • Red chilli flakes, to taste
  • Salt & freshly ground black pepper

For the chicken:

  • 1kg of mix chicken breast and boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • 25gr chopped fresh parsley

Method

  1. Prepare a marinade for the chicken: Combine the lemon juice, 1/3 cup olive oil, garlic, cumin, paprika, turmeric, cinnamon, allspice, chilli flakes, salt and pepper in a large bowl, then whisk to combine.
  2. Cut the chicken breast and/or thighs into strips, add to the marinade and mix well to coat. Cover and store in refrigerator for at least 1 hour or overnight.
  3. When ready to cook, preheat oven to 180C.
  4. Place a foil on an oven tray and top with a baking paper. Remove the chicken from the marinade, and place on the tray, spreading evenly across it.
  5. Put the chicken in the oven and roast for about 30 to 40 minutes, until crisp.DSC_1819 (2)
  6. Remove from the oven and use a sharp knife to slice the meat into small, thin shawarma-like pieces.
  7. To make the chicken even crisper, set a large frying pan over high heat, then add the sliced chicken, and sauté for few minutes till the some of the chicken pieces  turn brown and crisp. Season with additional salt and pepper to taste, if desired.
  8. Sprinkle with parsley over the top and serve with Israeli salad and tahini sauce.

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Happy and healthy day

Karin

Two Healthy Cookies

Food should be a culinary orgasm

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Photo from Burnt

Have you watched the movie Burnt yet? I couldn’t take my eyes of the screen and had to watch it twice… yes twice in a row in case I missed something… it’s not a movie for the Oscars and unfortunately  it doesn’t focus much on the actual food itself but if you love Michelin restaurants, fast kitchens and conceited chefs – then you should  definitely watch it. It’s all about the love of food, pushing the boundaries and second chances (that we all deserve).

I always knew chefs are arrogant, they think they are the closest thing to god and I loved Chef Adam John’s quote of his mentor Jean Luc:

“It was God who created oysters and apples and you can’t improve recipes like that but this is our job to try” and damn right we must try and try hard!

I also agreed with Chef Adam that “we should be dealing with a culinary orgasm not just interesting food”.

The movie is full with incredible photography, the composition and views of London’s sky line, the Langham and Billingsgate markets just reminded me of how much I love living in this city. Although we don’t grow the best fruit and vegetables in the world, we do have some of the most talented chefs and outstanding top restaurants. burnt-2

The movie kept me on my toes and my heart beating fast, the hue of the ingredients like the tomatoes on the table and the courgette flowers resting in a straight line, Billingsgate market –  I could smell the freshness of the fish. The immaculate kitchen, the clanking sound of the pots and pans, the sharpness of the knives.  This clinical white restaurant – exactly how I always wanted mine to be, like a pharmacy …

The effort and the million attempts behind every dish, the sleepless nights, tossing and turning, planning the next course or recipe.

The hopes, dreams, desire, ambition and stress to be successful, to be the best that we can be.

The team work, techniques, attention to detail, the thrill and determination to get it perfectly right.

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Photo from Burnt

All the fuss and hoo-ha, it’s my culinary addiction – I love watching it on a movie but it only intensifies why I will not work in a professional kitchen or will own my own restaurant.  It definitely inspired me to go back to my (not so small) kitchen and cook from the best ingredients I can get and visit again some of the fantastic markets we have here in London (if I can only wake up early enough!)

“Cooking should be consistent in experience but not consistent in taste. I want people to sit at that table and be sick with longing”.

Chef Adam Johns

So with that in mind, I’m going to plan my next week’s meal plan for the RESET program.

See you all soon again and have a great week

Karin

Two Healthy Cookies

Miso & Tahini Veg, Green Chicken Curry & Book Club!

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Hi all,

I hope you had a productive day today, mine was just crazy busy with our builders, some appointments, cooking and of course writing and developing  recipes for you guys.

So I’m getting straight to business as my book club is waiting for me to arrive in 5 minutes and we have three fantastic books to discuss ( I know, I can’t keep up with myself either…)

Anyway, I had a gorgeous lunch today with both my  daughter and husband, which both happened to be at home today as one was sick and the other worked from home, to my delight!

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We had roasted vegetables with Miso and Tahini dressing. I used the veggies that I had in my fridge and you can do the same (actually I did send my husband to the green grocer for some aubergines, I knew it will come handy to have him at home today!). You can swap and add any vegetables you like e.g. cauliflower, beets, broccoli etc. but remember if you are on a strict diet for weight loss some of the vegetables are starch and you are only allowed a hand full a day (e.g sweet potato, butter nut, parsnip, carrots, beetroot ).

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I also made the dinner, I promised yesterday and am still licking my lips from the range of flavours it had : the lime  and chilies; coriander and ginger;  garlic and coconut milk , oh my, that was sooo good!! I made a Green Thai Chicken Curry and served it on a raw cauliflower rice that I prepared yesterday as you remember?

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So here are the recipes , please keep trying them, post some photos and let me know your thoughts.

Roasted vegetables with miso-tahini dressing

Serves 4      DSC_1742 (2)

Ingredients

  • ½ butternut, diced
  • 3 shallots, quartered
  • 1 red pepper, sliced
  • 1 small sweet potato, sliced
  • 1 aubergine, diced
  • 2 courgettes, sliced
  • 4 garlic cloves, sliced

DSC_1716 (2)For the dressing:

  • ½ cup tahini
  • 2 tbsp miso
  • ½ lime juice
  • 2 tbsp rice vinegar
  • 1 tbs tamari
  • 2 tsp toasted sesame oil
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1 bunch of coriander, finely chopped
  • salt and black pepper to taste

Method

  • Pre heat oven to 200C.
  • Place all vegetables in a roasting pan with a baking sheet, spray with some oil spray and sprinkle with some black pepper.
  • Roast in the oven for 30-35 minutes, mixing once half way through roasting.
  • Once ready turn on the grill for 5 minutes to get some more colour.
  • Meanwhile make the dressing by mixing all the ingredients in a jar.
  • Roast some pine nuts, watch them closely so that they won’t burn.
  • Serve the roasted vegetables in a bowl topped with the dressing and pine nuts.

 

Green Thai Chicken Curry

Serves 4     DSC_1764 (2)

Ingredients:

  • 1TBS Coconut oil
  • 1 TBS Sesame oil
  • 500gr skinless Chicken breast
  • 125 gr Mangetout / sugar snap /green beans
  • 1 small tin Bamboo Shoots
  • 400ml Coconut Milk
  • 1 Lime, juice

 

DSC_1682 (2)For the curry paste:

  • 3 Green Chillies, de-seeded and chopped
  • 4 Spring Onions, chopped
  • 6 Garlic cloves, roughly crushed
  • 3 cm Ginger, roughly chopped
  • 2 stalks of lemon grass, roughly chopped
  • 30 gr coriander
  • 4-5 Kaffir lime leaves
  • 1 Lime, zest and juice
  • 2 TBS Tamari Sauce
  • 1 TBS Olive Oil
  • 1 tsp Coriander Seeds, crushed or coriander powder
  • 1 tsp Ground Cumin
  • 1 tsp coarsely ground Black Pepper

To Serve:

  • Cauliflower rice
  • Coriander leaves
  • 1 Red Chillie, de-seeded and finely chopped            DSC_1750 (2)

 

METHOD

  1. Cut the chicken into thin strips.
  2. Place all of the curry paste ingredients in a food processor and blitz to a paste. Use straight away or store in a jar in the fridge for up to 3 weeks or freeze.
  3. Place a large pan or wok over a high heat. Add the coconut and sesame oils and then carefully drop in the chicken. Add the green curry paste and stir-fry for about 5 minutes.
  4. Pour in the coconut milk and simmer for 20-25 minutes until thickened slightly.
  5. Add the mangetout or beans and bamboo shoots and stir well. Simmer for 3 minutes.
  6. Add the lime juice into the pan.
  7. Serve with cauliflower rice, topped with the chopped red chili and some coriander leaves.

 

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I’m running now to discuss some books with a glass of some green tea and fruits.

Karin

Two Healthy Cookies

 

Rising and Dining – A healthy diet should begin with a solid breakfast

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My dad phoned me this morning to tell me that recently he doesn’t feel so well and gets dizzy quiet often and would like to know what he needs to eat as he feels that he doesn’t eat well and neglects his health. My dad, lives in a different country to his three kids, it’s not easy as he is nearly 70, but I must say he is such an inspiration to me. He has been through so many ups and downs in his life but always keeps his head up and looks out for his kids’ best interests. So this was a perfect opportunity for me to help. First thing I asked was: What are you having for breakfast? And guess what he said??? “Nothing really!!” A coffee and sometimes an apple or a piece of white bread with cheese. As you can imagine I was petrified to hear that. As you have probably guessed, my dad is not alone. In the rush to get the kids to school or ourselves to work, plenty of us skip breakfast altogether.

Eating within two hours of waking can make a difference in the way you metabolize glucose, or blood sugar, all day. Your glucose level rises every time you eat, and your pancreas produces insulin to shuttle the glucose into your cells, where it’s used for energy. Research is finding that keeping glucose and insulin in the right balance has important effects on metabolism and health.

If you don’t bother with breakfast, though, the prolonged fasting might lead to a bigger than normal boost in hunger s, encouraging you to overeat at your next meal and leading to spikes and dips in glucose. Breakfast provides the body and brain with fuel after an overnight fast – that’s where its name originates, breaking the fast! Without breakfast you are effectively running on empty, like trying to start the car with no petrol!

Research involving adults and children has indicated that breakfast might enhance memory, attention, and the speed of processing information, reasoning, creativity, learning, and verbal abilities.

Breakfast can be good for your waistline too

Research shows those who eat breakfast are less likely to be overweight and more likely to be within their ideal weight range compared with breakfast skippers. If you skip breakfast, you’re more likely to reach for high sugar and fatty snacks mid-morning which probably won’t keep you full until lunch, despite a hefty calorie count. But of course that what you eat is important, if you’re trying to drop a few kilos, sitting down to a healthy, high-fibre breakfast could be the key to success. One reason may be that high-fibre foods fill you up on fewer calories. Fibre also slows the digestive process, which in turn wards off hunger spikes later.

You should aim to eat a solid breakfast topped with fruit, 1 tbsp of flaxseed, 1 tbsp of oat bran meal and include one of the following:

  • Low sugar granola with low-sugar yogurts (don’t head to the fat free yogurts as they are full of sugar to compensate for the luck of healthy fat).
  • Porridge, made of rolled oats or steal-cut and almonds milk.
  • 2 eggs any way you like with some fresh vegetables

With my dad’s health (all his tests and check-ups are perfect, thank goodness!) it is also have to do with the fact that he doesn’t eat often enough and doesn’t have healthy snacks in between main meals. He also hardly drinks water! But more about those subjects in the next few days.

And now back to me and my RESET plan.

So today at lunch time I really didn’t fancy Salad Niçoise, it was much too cold and I needed something warm and comforting so I made the Thai cauliflower rice, it was so yummy that I actually had it again for dinner, this time topped with the slow cook chicken breast. I have prepared the green Thai chicken but will have it tomorrow instead – I love having it all ready, waiting to be thrown together when needed!

Thai coconut (cauliflower) rice      FullSizeRender (3)

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 1 big cauliflower
  • 1 tbsp toasted sesame oil
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 shallots, finely chopped
  • 1 yellow pepper, diced
  • 1 red pepper, diced
  • 2 carrots, julienned or grated
  • 1 tsp fresh ginger, finely chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 chilli, chopped
  • 2 cups coconut milk
  • 5 spring onions, chopped
  • 1 cup cashews, coarsely chopped
  • 1bunch of coriander, chopped
  • salt and black pepper to taste

Method

  • In a food processor or slicer, chop the cauliflower until it is as small as rice.  IMG_9694 (2)
  • In a large sauté pan, heat the coconut and sesame oils, add the shallots, peppers, carrots, ginger, garlic and chilli and sauté on medium high heat for about 10 minutes.IMG_9697 (3)
  • Add the cauliflower rice and coconut milk and cook until nearly all milk is absorbed. Remove from the heat.
  • Add the chopped coriander, spring onions and cashews and serve.

This should last about 4-5 days in the fridge.

Lots of love and health

Karin

Two Healthy Cookies

The best place to begin my personal pursuit of happiness is at the end of my fork

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Sorry guys, I didn’t manage to cook my meal plan today in order to take some pictures and place the recipes….sometimes life gets in the way and I’m so happy I was so organised and spiralized some courgettes yesterday and made the slow cooker chicken breast as dinner which was ready in 10 minutes tonight and I fed my family and some friends!

I was teaching a salad workshop today for a group of ladies in Golders Green, London (yes, I also teach cooking courses besides my catering business) where I taught how to create your own salad dressing and what healthy substitutes we have for carb, sugar and fat. We also made three gorgeous salads: green coconut quinoa, roasted broccoli power salad and of course the Thai inspired kale salad from yesterday’s meal plan.

One of the tricks I taught today was to cook the quinoa with coconut milk, we used half of it for our salad and the other half was for breakfast with some berries on top – scrumptious and filling.

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All these greens just make me want to sing, fantasising about being on remote, hot beaches wearing a bikini….that’s what healthy food makes me do. It makes me so happy and my brain is clear and I just want to tell the world all about it and I want you all to feel the same even without the need for a glass of wine.

Can your diet make you happier? Yes it can!

It has been proven that foods that are rich in nutrients like vitamins A, B12, D, and E, and folate, iodine, magnesium (everything with dark green colour), calcium (dairy and greens!), iron, fibre, and omega-3 fatty acids ( Salmon) are your Essential Elements of Happiness.

I’m not going to bore you with all this Scientifics but just want to give you the bottom line – the best place to begin your personal pursuit of happiness is at the end of your fork.

I’m still sticking to my diet plan, by eating a mixture of three tasty salads for lunch and a bowl of courgettes spaghetti (sauté with spinach, garlic, parsley and chilli) and topped with the slow cook chicken for dinner – a bowl off happiness so delicious, so comforting and warm, who needs the white stuff? I just wanted to get into my PJ’s, stick a good movie on and slurp my bowl of courgette spaghetti, but I had to write the blog, so bed will have to wait.

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I hope your day was as good and green as mine and I look forward to seeing you all again here tomorrow.

Lots of love and happy food

Karin

Two Healthy Cookies